Jesmond+Dene+House

Pinched from the JDH brochure

A grand house with contemporary style, a leafy setting near the heart of the city. Jesmond Dene House is neither a townhouse nor a country house hotel. It’s simply 40 well-designed rooms in a richly historic building offering understated luxury and rather good food. Overlooking the small wooded valley of Jesmond Dene, it guarantees peace, escapism and a refreshing change. Newcastle’s city centre, however, is only a five-minute drive.

Fresh and light interiors are set against the fine, rich features of this Arts and Crafts house. Big beds, crisp bathrooms, space to work, space to relax. There are handsome rooms for dining, meeting and celebrating – from the wood-panelled Great Hall to the light-filled Garden Room. Eight of the bedrooms are in the New House, a modern interpretation of Arts and Crafts style. Food is straightforward, flavoursome, fresh, and under the guiding hand of the region’s leading chef restaurateur, Terry Laybourne.

The atmosphere is relaxed and friendly but with a passionate attention to detail. No gimmicks, no fuss; just a genuinely warm welcome and an invitation to indulge. Whatever the reason, we guarantee an atmosphere that’s relaxed and friendly but with a passionate attention to detail. No gimmicks, no fuss; just a genuinely warm welcome and an invitation to indulge.

A bit of history

One of Newcastle’s finest residential buildings, Jesmond Dene House is full of architectural bravura, historical detail and an intriguing cast list. The original Georgian house, designed by John Dobson – responsible for many of Newcastle’s handsome streets – was bought in 1871 by Captain Andrew Noble, a partner in Lord Armstrong’s Tyneside-based shipbuilding and armaments business. As this empire grew, and Armstrong took a back seat, Noble needed a grander house for business entertaining. He commissioned Norman Shaw (Cragside, New Scotland Yard), and local architect Frank Rich, to double the size of the house adding a west wing, billiard room, Gothic porch, Great Hall and a fleet of bedrooms. The panelling, plasterwork, stone carvings, exuberant chimneys and stained glass date from this time.

Knighted in 1902, Sir Andrew Noble moved in high society; Rudyard Kipling, Lord Baden-Powell, Admiral Togo, Chinese ministers and Japanese princes have all stayed or dined here. After Sir Andrew’s widow died, in 1929, the house was variously used as a college, Civil Defence establishment (tunnels still exist under the house), seminary and, until recently, as a residential school. It took 18 months to convert the empty building to a hotel which opened in 2005.